Album Review 5/22/18: Quiet Slang-Everything Matters But No one is Listening

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Everything Matters But No One is Listening is an album of reworked Philly punk band Beach Slang songs performed by lead singer, James Alex under the name Quiet Slang.

Our review format: The format is a straight forward expression of 5 separate thoughts. The best comparison would be to 5 text messages about a concert or album from your friend to you. Some messages may be only one or two words, some may be run-on sentences, and some may be paragraphs. We do promise not to ramble on and drift off topic like a text from your favorite grandparent.

Quiet Slang
RIYL: When Punk Bands play a ballad
Pseudo Genre: Chamber Punk

1. The original idea for this album started from an NPR Tiny Desk Concert. Alex gained further inspiration from Stephin Merrit’s lyric: “Why do we Keep shrieking/ When we mean soft things?” from the song “100,000 Fireflies” by Magnetic Fields. Talking to fans, Alex realized there was an audience for a solo album driven more by lyrics than music.

2. The album is a reworking of punk songs. They are performed with a cello and piano as the only accompaniment.

3. If you love some great cello playing with emotional lyrics, and we at SWB sure do, then this is the album for you.

4. Some of our favorite Lyrics:
from “Bad Art & Weirdo Ideas”: “I've always felt stuck, alone, or ashamed/The gutter's too tough, the stars are too safe/ I'm always that kid always out of place”
From “Future Mixtape for Art Kids”: “We're not lost, we are dying in style/ We're not fucked, we are fucking alive”
and From “Warpaint”: "Splatter warpaint on your cheek/ Bear your heart without apology/ Hang your anger, cut it loose/ Make this stick: I won’t give up on you”

5. Sometimes our favorite albums are groundbreaking and revolutionary. Sometimes our favorite albums are just beautiful and entertaining. This is one of those albums

Here you can listen to “Bad Art & Weirdo Ideas” by Quiet Slang followed by “Bad Art & Weirdo Ideas” by Beach Slang.

Album Review of Iceage- Beyondless

Here is a review of our current favorite album, Beyondless by Iceage.

Our review format: The format is a straight forward expression of 5 separate thoughts. The best comparison would be to 5 text messages about a concert or album from your friend to you. Some messages may be only one or two words, some may be run-on sentences, and some may be paragraphs. We do promise not to ramble on and drift off topic like a text from your favorite grandparent.

Iceage
RIYL: Old Artic Monkeys, LIFE, The Clash
Pseudo Genre: Punky Post Punk

1. It’s like Morrissey, King Krule and The Clash had a love child.
2. Ten years on, this Danish punk band is continuing to evolve and grow, which is not surprising given that none of the band is even 27 years old.
3. Iceage brings in pop stylings, utilizing horns and Sky Ferreira’s backing vocals on “Pain Killer”. Iceage does NOT make pop punk. Think The Birthday Party or The Clash not Green Day or Blink-182
4. Some of our favorite lyrics: from “The Day the Music Dies”: “Performed an exorcism on myself, Cited prayers and rites of deliverance, Yet here I am, somehow still possessed”
From “Thieves like Us”: “In echo chambers of fermented ethanol, Listen to reason as I voice my speculations, With the brains of a blowup doll”
and From “Pain Killer”: "Most when it's almost like a bane, You arrive like a siren refrain, Like death she takes everything, And dazes me like patent medicine”
5. This is another great album from a band that continues to experiment and grow with each album.

Here are some videos of songs from the album.

Album Review 4/11/18: L.A. Salami: The City of Bootmakers

L.A. salami does not have anything to do with a Southern California city or luncheon meats, but has everything to do with creating avant garde, genre bending 21st century Folk music...The album is of NOW, and tackles subjects such as gentrification ("Brick Lane"), radical Islam ("Terrorism (The ISIS Crisis)"),  the problems facing England with Brexit and great divisions ("England Is Unwell"), and the meaning of life ("Science+Buddhism= A Reality You Can Know")...Some great lyrics include: "and the cash flows from all the wealthy come in, Who seem not to like the scene that led them on, and the scene is gone" from "Brick Lane" and "I'm penniless, but I've sold my soul, I'm restless, but I've nowhere to go" from "Generation L(ost)...Lookman Adekunle Salami sings with the restrained energy and emotion of a hand grenade explosion being channeled through a drinking straw...Tackling important subjects would be a waste of time if his music was not catching and enjoyable. 

The album will be out and streaming everywhere on Friday 4/13. Here are a couple of the songs that we really like off of the new album (also "Terrorism (The ISIS Crisis)" is on last Friday's playlist).

 

Review Format

Today, with the Titus Andronicus review, we are introducing our new review format. This will be used for concerts, albums, music festivals, and anything else that we review.

The format is a straight forward expression of 5 separate thoughts with a bit of style and formatting borrowed from the old Larry King USA Today articles. The best comparison would be to 5 text messages about a concert or album from your friend. Some messages may be only one or two words, some may be runon sentences, and some may be paragraphs. We do promise not to ramble on and drift off topic like a text from your favorite grandparent.

Our goal is to be brief, informative, and to not simply rehash the same concert review written city after city using press release information and a few facts about the first 3 or 4 songs played (before the reviewer left to send in the review and head to sleep). We are music fans.  Our reviews may come a day late because our ears were ringing, hearts pumping, and adrenaline flowing after a show; and we did not want to sit down to compose our thoughts and edit our pictures and video.

We will try to always include photos and video, because concerts are an experience for the senses.